Max Planck scientists try to sequence nuclear DNA from Atapuerca

Max Planck scientists try to sequence nuclear DNA from Atapuerca

German scientists Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology are working to sequence nuclear DNA from remains of hominids removed from the Sima de los Huesos, Atapuerca, in Burgos, with an age of 400,000 years, he reported one of the co-directors of the deposit, Juan Luis Arsuaga.

Speaking to reporters, Arsuaga, who is also scientific director of the Museum of Human Evolution in Burgos, director of the Joint Center Evolution and Human Behavior, formed by the University Complutense and Carlos III Institute of Health, has stated that it is a “complex work” that will take years to be completed.

However, he explained that the first steps of this research can be found on a “relatively short” period and will be “striking” for their contributions to meet characteristics of these hominids.

The collaboration between the Atapuerca team and allowed the Max Planck Institute in September 2014 published a study of the mitochondrial DNA of a prehistoric bear.

In July this year took a historic step by sequencing mitochondrial DNA from a femur of the Sima of the Bones.

Arsuaga has explained that this is a complex process because the mitochondrial DNA can have about 60,000 bases, although the nuclear DNA has several billion.

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